More Art.
More Agency.
More Action.

Our Mission

More Art is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that collaborates with artists across their careers to catalyze social change by producing meaningful participatory public art for a broad audience. Through creative engagement, More Art empowers all people to utilize art to connect with others, build awareness, and drive action on topics that affect our lives and communities.

We define public art as a process and/or method of exhibition in a public space that is accessible to a broad audience.

We define a socially engaged practice as involving the public in creating art to build power and agency among participants and strive towards equity and justice.

We believe art and artists are integral to empowering social justice movements by creatively illuminating social issues, engaging new audiences in activism, and catalyzing public discourse.

More Art

We believe that art should be free and accessible, and we believe that art empowers all of us.

More Agency

We believe in the self-determination of everyone. Our process is open, grounded, and flexible.

More Action

By providing a platform to experience social issues through art, More Art leads to action that paves the way towards transformation and change.

Our history

Since its inception in 2004, More Art has produced a wide range of projects reflecting the concerns and challenges of various New York City communities. More Art focused on building collaborations between our neighbors by creating opportunities for a creative community education and public art projects. Consequently, our projects have gone increasingly ambitious, transcending the traditional boundaries of public art and expanding into workshops, lectures and panel discussions.

Download our Strategic Vision Plan for 2019-2022
Download our 10 year anniversary prospectus

More Art by the numbers

20

Years old

79

of budget spent on program expenses

60

Public art and education projects produced

3.24

Invested in the arts

Our Core Principles

In commissioning and producing socially-engaged art projects in the community, More Art adheres to the following principles:

Quality

While presenting and supporting a multitude of perspectives, all our projects meet the highest standards of quality.

Collaboration

We collaborate with organizations that are deeply rooted in their communities to help us shape projects that are culturally sensitive to those communities.

Relevance

Our projects address ideas and issues that are relevant to the artists and the communities involved. All projects are designed specifically for the public spaces in which they are presented.

Social Engagement

We design our projects as partnerships, maximizing engagement between artists and community participants; likewise, we design our exhibitions to maximize engagement with the broader community and the general public.

Accessibility

All our projects are free and accessible to the general public.

FAQ

What does More Art do?

More Art fosters collaborations between professional artists and communities to create thought-provoking public art and educational programs that inspire broad discourse regarding social and cultural issues.

Our core programs include:

Public Art Commissions

  • One large scale project a year with an established artist. Includes community partnerships with other institutions and a series of contextualizing public programs.
  • Plus one or two smaller projects per year with Engaging Artists program alumni or other emerging-to-established artists.

Engaging Artists

  • Fellowship: Year-long fellowship for 8 artists/collectives. For emerging artists.
  • Commission: $8k award and support for a public art project. For early career artists.

At the Table

  • Series of conversations for small groups. In-person and virtual. 2-4 a year.
What makes More Art unique?

Through presenting public art to diverse communities, More Art ignites sparks for critically considering our society as a whole, and our place within it. Through accessible programming, artist talks, and a range of educational workshops surrounding each piece, More Art supplements viewers’ public art experience with a critical understanding of relevant social themes and art’s potential to serve as a communicative and expressive vehicle, often promoting positive change.

What is public art? What is socially-engaged art?

Public Art

We define public art as a process and/or method of exhibition in a public space (away from a traditional art environment such as a museum or gallery) that is accessible to a broad audience. The public art that More Art produces is always temporary and ephemeral.

For art to be truly public, it can’t be available just to those who generally have access to cultural institutions. If art is to truly inhabit the public sphere, it has to meet communities in geographic and social locations that bridge socio-economic, racial, and ethnic boundaries.

By producing museum quality projects and programs in parks and plazas as well as in spaces such as libraries and outer borough community centers, More Art ensures that commissioned artworks are made for, with, and seen by the public at large.

Socially Engaged Art

We define a socially engaged practice as involving the public in creating art to build power and agency among participants and strive towards equity and justice. The work places artists in dialogue with a group of individuals or non-art institutions, almost always outside of museum and traditional art institution walls. Socially engaged art challenges traditional ideas of art as static, aesthetic and symbolic, calling into question standard representations of what art is and can be. As an organization, we believe in producing projects that are experiential and highlight our shared humanity.

What happens when you take art out of conventional spaces?

Taking art out of conventional spaces enables More Art to engage new audiences – people who often do not have access to high quality cultural programming. By doing so, we create an opportunity for our projects and programs to be accessed on a more capillary scale from people of all walks of life. Further, by commissioning work that grapples with larger societal issues, More Art facilitates constructive public debate.

More Art’s mission brings art to people in public spaces and, in the process, incites ideas, challenges preconceived notions, and inspires the minds of many.

Who do we work with? Who are our partners?

To directly engage a diversity of communities, More Art partners with numerous grassroots organizations to organize and implement workshops, events, and interventions that provide a platform for new audiences to meaningfully engage with contemporary art. Past partner organizations include Hudson Guild; Greenwich House, Senior Center on the Square; Judson Memorial Church; Turning Point Brooklyn; Center for Family Life Brooklyn; The Fortune Society;  Center for Justice Innovation; and the Brooklyn Public Library, among many others. More Art also actively partners with public schools across New York City.

In addition, More Art works with municipal agencies such as the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, the New York City Department of Education, The New York City Department of Transportation, as well as private institutions, and local businesses to present new works of public art.

Are More Art programs free of cost?

Yes. We believe that in order to make public art truly public, it has to be accessible to everyone, regardless of economic circumstances.

Where does More Art work?

More Art is based in New York City. We have presented public art projects in Manhattan, Queens, and Brooklyn. We have experimented with expanding our projects nationally and internationally, but we are primarily dedicated to working in NYC.

How do we work with artists?

More Art collaborates with emerging, mid-career, and established artists across all media to produce vibrant, relevant, and topical works of socially-engaged public art.

As an arts organization, we give primacy to artists’ ideas, visions, and practices. As much as More Art’s commissions seek to deeply engage the larger public, provoke thoughtful conversations, and strive to promote social change, we believe that aesthetic considerations are crucial and a vital component of socially engaged art. The way that More Art collaborates with and supports artists is a key part of our work. Our small scale enables us to take risks and be responsive to the issues of the times, the needs of artists and communities, and the creative process.

What is our artist selection process?

Although we always welcome artists’ proposals, our public art projects are primarily by invitation only. We invite emerging, mid-career, and established artists to start a conversation with us, and ultimately submit a proposal. Projects are selected based on their artistic merit and relevance to contemporary dialogue about social justice and progressive change. Through extensive research with the community, project incubation, and sustained partnerships with local organizations, all projects effectively engage the community through public workshops, events, and panel discussions.

More Art’s Engaging Artists Fellowship and Commission Program, however, hosts an annual open call for emerging artists with a socially engaged practice. For more information on Engaging Artists, click here.

What makes Engaging Artists a unique fellowship program?

Engaging Artists provides an opportunity for emerging artists to immerse themselves in critical social issues through potential partnerships with community organizations. This is just another way that More Art engages the public with the arts like no other organization. The artists receive professional development through a intensives, monthly speaker series, periodical curatorial reviews, group presentations, and project support opportunities. For more information on Engaging Artists, click here.

Are you an artist, school, arts organization, or community organization? Would you like to work with More Art?

We are always looking to establish new partnerships with schools and community organizations across NYC. Contact us at info@moreart.org for more information.

Projects

Engaging Artists Projects
12
Events
12
Public Art
36
Public Art

Everyone Who Lives Here is a New Yorker

Public Art

New York 2044

A speculative social sculpture in the form of an online and print newspaper that proposes the city we want to inhabit in 2044, and how to get there. 
Public Art

I cannot not grieve: CRY SCREAM SHOUT SING

Elmhurst Hospital, Central Park, and The Green-Wood Cemetery
Public Art

Mind Forged Manacles / Manacle Forged Minds

Columbus Park, Downtown Brooklyn
Public Art

Public Water

Prospect Park, Brooklyn, NY
Public Art

Ustedes (Them)

Governors Island, NYC.
Public Art

Loro (Them)

Parco Sempione, Milan, Italy
Public Art

Night Watch

East River and Hudson River along the shores of Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx, and New Jersey.
Public Art

Out of Thin Air

City Hall Park, Manhattan
Public Art

NYsferatu: Symphony Of A Century

Public screenings all around NYC.
Public Art

Clean Labor

Wythe Hotel, Williamsburg, Brooklyn
Public Art

MONTH2MONTH

Private residences in Manhattan and Brooklyn, New York.
Public Art

Borrowed Light

Located next to the Sunset Park Recreational Center 44th St & 7th Ave, Brooklyn
Public Art

9-5

Brookfield Place Pavilion, Lower Manhattan.
Public Art

The Disappearing City

Hudson Guild Gallery and Greenwich House, NYC
Public Art

On The Impossibility of Freedom in a Country Founded on Slavery and Genocide

Manhattan Bridge Archway Plaza, DUMBO, Brooklyn.
Public Art

Residents of New York

West 4th Street Subway Station, LaGuardia Place, and throughout the East and West Village.
Public Art

Envision New York 2017

Online/Digital project
Public Art

Moon Guardians

Gansevoort Square, Meatpacking District, NYC.
Public Art

Sunspotting a Walking Forest

Jenny Marketou, 2012 – The Highline, New York.
Public Art

Abraham Lincoln: War Veteran Projection

Krzysztof Wodiczko, 2012 – Union Square, New York, NY
Public Art

When You’re Looking at Me, You’re Looking at Country

Chelsea
Public Art

Lunar Rabbit

Joan Jonas, 2011 - Hudson River Park, New York, NY.
Public Art

El Club de Protesta | The Protest Club

Pablo Helguera, 2011 - The Highline and the Hudson Guild, New York.
Public Art

The Mysterious House of Colors

Justin Berry, 2009 – Chelsea
Public Art

The Wandering Band

Ana Prvacki, 2010 – The Highline, New York, NY.
Public Art

An Album: Hudson Guild

Kimsooja, 2009 – Chelsea
Public Art

AWGTHTGTWTA (Are We Going to Have to Go Through with This Again?)

Tony Oursler, 2008 — Chelsea
Public Art

Sleeping Monster Produced by Reason

Nicola Verlato, 2008 – Chelsea
Public Art

Neighborhood

Anthony Goicolea, 2008 – Chelsea
Public Art

Soundless Pounding of Accelerating Dreams

A photography project engaging teens from Clinton Middle School.
Public Art

Bodhi Obfuscatus (Allegiance)

Chelsea
Public Art

Untitled (Inside); Untitled (Outside)

Chelsea, 2007
Public Art

Enemy Kitchen

Hudson Guild Community Center, Chelsea, New York.
Public Art

Collective Portrait

Chelsea
Public Art

Erasers

Chelsea, 2005
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All
60
Public Art

The Silent Unseen Audio Tour: An Embodied Introduction to Asian American History

by Ayo Ohs, 2024. Queens Museum.
Public Art

Why Not Public Housing? A Save Section 9 Teach-In

Virtual workshop, April 8, 2024
Public Art

Everyone Who Lives Here is a New Yorker

Public Art

New York 2044

A speculative social sculpture in the form of an online and print newspaper that proposes the city we want to inhabit in 2044, and how to get there. 
Public Art

A Mobile Home

A mobile installation resembling an emergency shelter tent, serving as both a public sculpture and an immersive performance stage.
Public Art

Rituals of Social Transformation

Engaging Artists Fellows, 2024 - HeadHi, Brooklyn, NY.
Public Art

I cannot not grieve: CRY SCREAM SHOUT SING

Elmhurst Hospital, Central Park, and The Green-Wood Cemetery
Public Art

Beyond Memorial

East Harlem and Brownsville
Public Art

Gates, Borders, Barriers: Jonathan González

2023 - Columbus Park, Brooklyn, NY.
Public Art

Of Manacles and Monuments

Center for Brooklyn History, 2023.
Public Art

Gates, Borders, Barriers: Engaging Artists Fellows

2023 - Columbus Park, Brooklyn, NY.
Public Art

Networks of Collective Care

Recess, Brooklyn.
Public Art

Untitled (Comedy Show)

Pablo Helguera, 2023.
Public Art

The Red String

Bowne Playground in Flushing, Queens, and Columbus Park in Chinatown, Manhattan.
Public Art

Gates, Borders, Barriers: george emilio sanchez & Patti Ortiz

2022 - Columbus Park, Brooklyn, NY.
Public Art

Gates, Borders, Barriers: Julian Louis Phillips

2022 - Columbus Park, Brooklyn, NY.
Public Art

Gates, Borders, Barriers: Resistance Revival Chorus and Pennants & Poets

2022 - Columbus Park, Brooklyn, NY.
Public Art

Mind Forged Manacles / Manacle Forged Minds

Columbus Park, Downtown Brooklyn
Public Art

Futures, Narratives, and Networks

2020 - 2021 Engaging Artists Fellows - Queens Museum
Public Art

Beam Ensemble

Crotona Park, Bronx
Public Art

Public Water

Prospect Park, Brooklyn, NY
Public Art

Ustedes (Them)

Governors Island, NYC.
Public Art

Trans Boxing

New York City, San Francisco, Portland, Seattle, Cincinnati, and New Orleans
Public Art

Waiting for the session to begin

Coney Island Beach Boardwalk/Riegelmann Boardwalk, Brooklyn NY.
Public Art

Loro (Them)

Parco Sempione, Milan, Italy
Public Art

Night Watch

East River and Hudson River along the shores of Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx, and New Jersey.
Public Art

Out of Thin Air

City Hall Park, Manhattan
Public Art

Building Stories

Flux Factory, Long Island City
Public Art

Hello, it’s me

Hudson Guild Gallery.
Public Art

Almost Home / Casi Llegando a Casa

Bridget Bartolini and Priscilla Stadler, with Milton X. Trujillo
Public Art

NYsferatu: Symphony Of A Century

Public screenings all around NYC.
Public Art

Clean Labor

Wythe Hotel, Williamsburg, Brooklyn
Public Art

Funeral Portrait Service (Young Jeong Sajin)

Multiple locations in Lower Manhattan, Flushing, Queens, and Ridgefield, NJ
Public Art

Engaging Artists at the Queens Museum

Queens Museum
Public Art

MONTH2MONTH

Private residences in Manhattan and Brooklyn, New York.
Public Art

Borrowed Light

Located next to the Sunset Park Recreational Center 44th St & 7th Ave, Brooklyn
Public Art

9-5

Brookfield Place Pavilion, Lower Manhattan.
Public Art

REMAP

Jefferson Market Library
Public Art

The Disappearing City

Hudson Guild Gallery and Greenwich House, NYC
Public Art

On The Impossibility of Freedom in a Country Founded on Slavery and Genocide

Manhattan Bridge Archway Plaza, DUMBO, Brooklyn.
Public Art

Residents of New York

West 4th Street Subway Station, LaGuardia Place, and throughout the East and West Village.
Public Art

Envision New York 2017

Online/Digital project
Public Art

Moon Guardians

Gansevoort Square, Meatpacking District, NYC.
Public Art

Sunspotting a Walking Forest

Jenny Marketou, 2012 – The Highline, New York.
Public Art

Abraham Lincoln: War Veteran Projection

Krzysztof Wodiczko, 2012 – Union Square, New York, NY
Public Art

When You’re Looking at Me, You’re Looking at Country

Chelsea
Public Art

Lunar Rabbit

Joan Jonas, 2011 - Hudson River Park, New York, NY.
Public Art

El Club de Protesta | The Protest Club

Pablo Helguera, 2011 - The Highline and the Hudson Guild, New York.
Public Art

The Mysterious House of Colors

Justin Berry, 2009 – Chelsea
Public Art

The Wandering Band

Ana Prvacki, 2010 – The Highline, New York, NY.
Public Art

An Album: Hudson Guild

Kimsooja, 2009 – Chelsea
Public Art

AWGTHTGTWTA (Are We Going to Have to Go Through with This Again?)

Tony Oursler, 2008 — Chelsea
Public Art

Sleeping Monster Produced by Reason

Nicola Verlato, 2008 – Chelsea
Public Art

Neighborhood

Anthony Goicolea, 2008 – Chelsea
Public Art

Soundless Pounding of Accelerating Dreams

A photography project engaging teens from Clinton Middle School.
Public Art

Bodhi Obfuscatus (Allegiance)

Chelsea
Public Art

Untitled (Inside); Untitled (Outside)

Chelsea, 2007
Public Art

Enemy Kitchen

Hudson Guild Community Center, Chelsea, New York.
Public Art

Collective Portrait

Chelsea
Public Art

Erasers

Chelsea, 2005
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